Diesel Exhaust and Cancer: The Link Nobody Is Talking About

diesel and cancer

Diesel fuel is derived from crude oil and is used primarily by trucks, buses, trains, and other large vehicles. There are also some smaller passenger vehicles that use diesel fuel, which is made up of gas and soot. The gas portion of diesel fuel is mostly carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. The soot portion of the fuel is made up of organic materials, soot, and metallic compounds.

 

When it comes to diesel exhaust, the last thing you want is to inhale it into your lungs. Unfortunately, many people do this every day, putting themselves at risk of developing cancer without even realizing it.

 

Exposure to Diesel Exhaust

 

How much we are exposed to diesel fuel varies, and it is difficult to determine how much people are exposed due to the complexity of the chemical makeup of exhaust. Truck drivers, toll booth workers, miners, and heavy equipment operators are exposed more than other members of the public. You may also be exposed while sitting in traffic, riding a bus, or standing next to a diesel engine that is idling.

 

Diesel Exhaust and Cancer

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there have been animal studies that found a link between diesel exhaust and cancer. The studies found that the lung is the primary location where cancer may form after exposure to diesel fuel. The World Health Organization found that those who are exposed to diesel exhaust every day were more likely to develop cancer than those who were not.

 

At-Risk Occupations

 

Your job could be putting you at risk of developing diesel exhaust-related cancer. There are several occupations that are more at risk for developing cancer than others. These include:

 

  • Material handlers
  • Mechanics
  • Mining
  • Motor transport operators

 

Miners have the highest incidence of cancer from diesel fuel exhaust, with 46 percent of the lung cancers and motor transport operators following with 33 percent. Mechanics had an incidence of nine percent, while material handlers made up eight percent of the lung cancer diagnoses.

 

Human Carcinogen

 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies diesel fuel as a human carcinogen due to its composition of gases and particulates. Because diesel fuel contains elemental carbon, it is dangerous to humans as it has been proven to cause lung cancer.

 

In most countries, there is no exposure limit to diesel exhaust, which means many employees are exposed to lethal levels of diesel exhaust on a daily basis. There is evidence that even low levels of diesel exhaust may lead to cancer, causing an estimated five percent of all lung cancers. For those who smoke, the risk of lung cancer rises significantly.

 

Cardiovascular Disease

 

In addition to lung cancer, long-term exposure to diesel exhaust may also be associated with cardiovascular disease. It is also a known respiratory irritant, and it could cause issues for the short term with eyes and throat. Too much exposure can also lead to cough, phlegm, light-headedness, and nausea. There have also been links between diesel exhaust and bladder cancer.

 

As mesothelioma lawyers fight for victims of asbestos exposure diesel, fuel also joins the formerly widely-used mineral on the list of lung cancer hazard substances. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with cancer that may be linked to exposure to diesel exhaust, reach out to an attorney for guidance and advice.

 

When you develop cancer after being exposed to carcinogens at work through no fault of your own, you need to hold the company accountable for the harm they caused. With an attorney’s help, you can file a claim for damages like doctor visits, hospital charges, lost wage reimbursement, and other expenses that are associated with your cancer.

Diesel fuel is derived from crude oil and is used primarily by trucks, buses, trains, and other large vehicles. There are also some smaller passenger vehicles that use diesel fuel, which is made up of gas and soot. The gas portion of diesel fuel is mostly carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. The soot portion of the fuel is made up of organic materials, soot, and metallic compounds.

 

When it comes to diesel exhaust, the last thing you want is to inhale it into your lungs. Unfortunately, many people do this every day, putting themselves at risk of developing cancer without even realizing it.

 

Exposure to Diesel Exhaust

 

How much we are exposed to diesel fuel varies, and it is difficult to determine how much people are exposed due to the complexity of the chemical makeup of exhaust. Truck drivers, toll booth workers, miners, and heavy equipment operators are exposed more than other members of the public. You may also be exposed while sitting in traffic, riding a bus, or standing next to a diesel engine that is idling.

 

Diesel Exhaust and Cancer

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there have been animal studies that found a link between diesel exhaust and cancer. The studies found that the lung is the primary location where cancer may form after exposure to diesel fuel. The World Health Organization found that those who are exposed to diesel exhaust every day were more likely to develop cancer than those who were not.

 

At-Risk Occupations

 

Your job could be putting you at risk of developing diesel exhaust-related cancer. There are several occupations that are more at risk for developing cancer than others. These include:

 

  • Material handlers
  • Mechanics
  • Mining
  • Motor transport operators

 

Miners have the highest incidence of cancer from diesel fuel exhaust, with 46 percent of the lung cancers and motor transport operators following with 33 percent. Mechanics had an incidence of nine percent, while material handlers made up eight percent of the lung cancer diagnoses.

 

Human Carcinogen

 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies diesel fuel as a human carcinogen due to its composition of gases and particulates. Because diesel fuel contains elemental carbon, it is dangerous to humans as it has been proven to cause lung cancer.

 

In most countries, there is no exposure limit to diesel exhaust, which means many employees are exposed to lethal levels of diesel exhaust on a daily basis. There is evidence that even low levels of diesel exhaust may lead to cancer, causing an estimated five percent of all lung cancers. For those who smoke, the risk of lung cancer rises significantly.

 

Cardiovascular Disease

 

In addition to lung cancer, long-term exposure to diesel exhaust may also be associated with cardiovascular disease. It is also a known respiratory irritant, and it could cause issues for the short term with eyes and throat. Too much exposure can also lead to cough, phlegm, light-headedness, and nausea. There have also been links between diesel exhaust and bladder cancer.

 

As mesothelioma lawyers fight for victims of asbestos exposure diesel, fuel also joins the formerly widely-used mineral on the list of lung cancer hazard substances. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with cancer that may be linked to exposure to diesel exhaust, reach out to an attorney for guidance and advice.

 

When you develop cancer after being exposed to carcinogens at work through no fault of your own, you need to hold the company accountable for the harm they caused. With an attorney’s help, you can file a claim for damages like doctor visits, hospital charges, lost wage reimbursement, and other expenses that are associated with your cancer.

 

Mandy Kloppers
Author: Mandy Kloppers

Mandy is a qualified therapist who treats depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD, trauma, and many other types of mental health issues. She provides online therapy around the world for those needing support and also provides relationship counselling.

Mandy Kloppers

Mandy is a qualified therapist who treats depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD, trauma, and many other types of mental health issues. She provides online therapy around the world for those needing support and also provides relationship counselling.

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