Why People React Differently to Smoking Cannabis

Why People React Differently to Smoking Cannabis

Try to remember your first cannabis trip. Were you with friends or alone? Did you laugh or get scared? Or perhaps you didn’t feel anything at all, besides the uncertainty coming with the thought “is that it yet?” 

 

Just as everyone’s first time is different, so is each next trip in a stoner’s career. To a degree, it depends on a weed strain that you’re ingesting. If you’re an experienced pot passionate, you probably know it best – if you’re smoking Black Widow, you will possibly experience very severe munchies. If it’s Runtz weed, you are most likely to feel an initial rush. If it’s a mixture, you might get a surprise in the form of an unexpected laugh attack or go into an in-depth discussion on the meaning of existence with your equally high friend.  

Summing up – weed is great! What’s there not to like? 

 

Well, as it turns out, there are a few things. In fact, many people experience the effects of cannabis that are not that pleasant. We’re talking about entering the infamous world of bad trips – constant paranoia, anxiety, dizziness, schizophrenic attacks, and many others.  

 

If you’ve ever wondered why people react to cannabis so differently, we’ve got all the answers you need. (Okay – maybe except for the ones about existence.) So, take a lighter and join(t) us on a small cannabis journey.  

 

Genetics 

 

Scientists have proved that genetics plays a huge role in how a person experiences cannabis high. It all stems from the level of endocannabinoids in the body. Due to a genetic mutation, in some people, it is higher. Thus, when they ingest even a small amount of cannabis, they are much more prone to experience more severe trip effects. Those unfortunate ones are more likely to experience anxiety and paranoia, and their trip will begin sooner than for other people.  

 

Brain Region 

 

According to one of the newest studies on rats, each organism experiences cannabis high differently because different parts of their brains respond to cannabis stimuli. In short, the effect of THC has other effects in different parts of the brain.  

 

 

 

Thoughts on life and love does not promote, condone or advocate licit or illicit drug use. Thoughts on life and love cannot be held responsible for material on its website pages, or pages to which we provide links, which promote, condone or advocate licit or illicit drug use or illegal activities.

 

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